Skeptical Blender
xxrhian:

this makes me sooo sick. 

xxrhian:

this makes me sooo sick. 

Well, bye Tumblr

I’m going to work on a farm in the Blue Mountains of Jamaica till August (WWOOFing). Won’t see you till then. Bye!

sans-methode:

imaginedragons:

what real mens activists look like (see more here)

"women don’t owe you shit"

Much madness is divinest Sense—
To a discerning Eye—
Much Sense—the starkest Madness—
‘Tis the Majority—
In this, as All, prevail—
Assent—and you are sane—
Demur—you’re straightway dangerous—
And handled with a Chain—
Emily Dickinson (1862)
The AP Tells The Story of Hamamatou Harouna

Over the past year, conflict between Muslims and Christians has killed thousands of people in the Central African Republic, a nation of about 4.6 million that sits almost precisely at the heart of Africa. As families flee, it is often children who carry the weight of the crisis on their backs.

Nearly half a million children have been displaced by violence in the country last year, with many hiding out in forests, according to UNICEF. Hundreds have become separated from their families, lost or simply too slow to keep up.

That’s what left Hamamatou and her brother trudging along the red dirt path on an unlikely journey that would reflect a world turned upside down by the complexities of war. The AP pieced together the story from interviews with the girl over two weeks and information from witnesses, health workers, priests and medical records.

Hamamatou, a Muslim girl, grew up in Guen, a village so remote that it can hardly be reached during the rainy season. Before the conflict, it was home to about 2,500 Muslims, a quarter of the population, many of whom worked as diamond miners. Today only three remain.

Life had not been kind to Hamamatou. She lost her father at age 7. A year later, her limbs withered from polio, a disease that had almost died worldwide but is now coming back in countries torn by war and poverty.

The pain started in her toes, and a traditional healer could do little for her. Within a month, she could no longer walk. Soon she had to crawl across the dirt.

Most days she helped her mother sell tiny plastic bags of salt and okra, each one tied firmly with a knot. Hamamatou had never been to school a day in her life, but she spoke two African languages and knew how to make change.

Her brother, Souleymane, doted on her like a parent, helping her get around as best he could. With what little money he had, he bought her stunning silver earrings, with chains that swayed from a ball in each ear.

On the day of the attack, Christian militia fighters burst out of the forest with machetes and rifles to seek revenge on the civilians they accused of supporting Muslim rebels. Hamamatou’s mother scooped up her baby, grabbed the hands of two other children and disappeared into the masses. Souleymane was left carrying his sister.

He headed deeper and deeper into the forest on paths used by local cattle herders. His back hunched forward from his sister’s weight. The cacophony of insects drowned out the sound of his labored breathing.

The crisp morning air gave way to an unforgiving afternoon sun. Hamamatou didn’t know how far they had walked, only that they had not yet reached the next town, 6 miles (10 kilometers) away. It was clear they would never make it to safety this way.

Exhausted, Souleymane placed his sister down on the ground and told her he was heading for help. If he didn’t come back, he said, she should make as much noise as possible so someone would find her.

Hamamatou told her brother she would wait for him in the grass, in the shade of a large tree.

As evening fell, hunger set in. Hamamatou had nothing to eat or drink. She talked aloud to her brother and mother as though they were still beside her. But with each sound of the grass moving, she feared wild boars would come to eat her.

She cried until her eyelids were swollen. She said aloud: “I have been abandoned.”

The Associated Press tells the story of Hamamatou Harouna, victim of the ongoing crisis in the Central African Republic.

Please remember that this is an ongoing conflict. Even at this second. 

David Graeber on “Bullshit Jobs”
"If you want a career pursuing any form of value other than monetary value—if you want to work in journalism, and pursue truth, or in the arts, and pursue beauty, or in some charity or international NGO or the UN, and pursue social justice—well, even assuming you can acquire the requisite degrees, for the first few years they won’t even pay you. So you’re supposed to live in New York or some other expensive city on no money for a few years after graduation. Who else can do that except children of the elite? So if you’re a fork-lift operator or even a florist, you know your kid is unlikely to ever become a CEO, but you also know there’s no way in a million years they’ll ever become drama critic for the New Yorker or an international human rights lawyer. The only way they could get paid a decent salary to do something noble, something that’s not just for the money, is to join the army. So saying “support the troops” is a way of saying “fuck you” to the cultural elite who think you’re a bunch of knuckle-dragging cavemen, but who also make sure your kid would never be able to join their club of rich do-gooders even if he or she was twice as smart as any of them."

http://www.salon.com/2014/06/01/help_us_thomas_piketty_the_1s_sick_and_twisted_new_scheme/

Immediate independence for Hawai’i and any interested Native American tribe

Honor Indian Treaties. 

The American annexation and continued occupation of Hawai’i is illegitimate.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008_occupation_of_Iolani_Palace

As long as we’re talking about reparations, we should talk about this as well.

crystalsrad:

this is my FAVORITE one so far

crystalsrad:

this is my FAVORITE one so far

When someone truly great leaves us, there is a palpable sense that we must figure out a way to go into the unknown future without them. Maya Angelou was one of those people. RIP.

nothing2c:

wnyc:

Poet, author, and activist Maya Angelou has died at 86. Brian Lehrer spoke with her last year about her life, work, family, and more.
-Jody, BL Show-


Here on the pulse of this new day
You may have the grace to look up and out
And into your sister’s eyes, into
Your brother’s face, your country
And say simply
Very simply
With hope
Good morning. 

nothing2c:

wnyc:

Poet, author, and activist Maya Angelou has died at 86. Brian Lehrer spoke with her last year about her life, work, family, and more.

-Jody, BL Show-

Here on the pulse of this new day

You may have the grace to look up and out

And into your sister’s eyes, into

Your brother’s face, your country

And say simply

Very simply

With hope

Good morning. 

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by  Matthias Steinbach 
Each month, two to three new cases are admitted for tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment in MSF’s Green House clinic in Mathare, one of the largest under-resourced neighborhoods in Nairobi, Kenya. In early 2014, MSF put the first patient on “compassionate use” treatment with bedaquiline, the first new drug to treat TB in 40 years. This allows a pharmaceutical company to provide a drug that has not yet been through all the required clinical trials to physicians for patients who have no other therapeutic alternative. According to the World Health Organization, Kenya ranks tenth on the list of countries with the 22 highest TB burdens in the world and third in Africa for prevalence and incidence. 

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by  Matthias Steinbach

Each month, two to three new cases are admitted for tuberculosis and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment in MSF’s Green House clinic in Mathare, one of the largest under-resourced neighborhoods in Nairobi, Kenya. In early 2014, MSF put the first patient on “compassionate use” treatment with bedaquiline, the first new drug to treat TB in 40 years. This allows a pharmaceutical company to provide a drug that has not yet been through all the required clinical trials to physicians for patients who have no other therapeutic alternative. According to the World Health Organization, Kenya ranks tenth on the list of countries with the 22 highest TB burdens in the world and third in Africa for prevalence and incidence. 

It reads: “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.”I love the juxtaposition of the script of one of the first societies to introduce a hierarchical society to humans with the text of a document that seeks to bring that period of history to a final close. Full circle. 

It reads: “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.”

I love the juxtaposition of the script of one of the first societies to introduce a hierarchical society to humans with the text of a document that seeks to bring that period of history to a final close. Full circle. 

“To appreciate the wild and sharp flowers of these October fruits, it is necessary that you be breathing the sharp October or November air. The outdoor air and exercise which the walker gets give a different tone to his palate, and he craves a fruit which the sedentary would call harsh and crabbed. They must be eaten in the fields, when your system is all aglow with exercise, when the frosty weather nips your fingers, the wind rattles the bare boughs or rustles the few remaining leaves, and the jay is heard screaming around. What is sour in the house a bracing walk makes sweet.”
Not an October fruit. But the idea is the same.

To appreciate the wild and sharp flowers of these October fruits, it is necessary that you be breathing the sharp October or November air. The outdoor air and exercise which the walker gets give a different tone to his palate, and he craves a fruit which the sedentary would call harsh and crabbed. They must be eaten in the fields, when your system is all aglow with exercise, when the frosty weather nips your fingers, the wind rattles the bare boughs or rustles the few remaining leaves, and the jay is heard screaming around. What is sour in the house a bracing walk makes sweet.”

Not an October fruit. But the idea is the same.

And he gave it for his opinion that, whoever could make two ears of corn or two blades of grass to grow upon a spot of ground where only one grew before, would deserve better of mankind, and do more essential service to his country than the whole race of politicians put together.
Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels
Activism has turned into one big group therapy session. It doesn’t matter what we accomplish—what matters is how we feel about it. The goal of the action isn’t to change the material balance of power, it’s to feel “empowered”… This rerouting of the goal from political change to inner change is the reaction of both a spoiled, self-absorbed people, and the utterly desperate, desperate to do something, anything.